Analyze™ American Lifestyles™ 2017

American Lifestyles™ 2017 is a new consumer classification system from Analyze™ that segments the US population into 32 sociometric and psychographic clusters using a combination of age, income, urbanicity, household composition, buying patterns and personal interests. American Lifestyles™ 2017 is designed to complement existing systems by providing a middle ground between the complex multivariate clustering systems like Mosaic USA, PRISM or Personicx that deliver large numbers of similar categories, and systems that offer only a few broad segments such as income or generational boundaries. American Lifestyles™ 2017 can help small and medium size businesses and advertisers understand housing patterns, buying preferences, disposable income, internet use and online purchasing habits, digital media consumption and travel patterns as they differ across regions, economic means and family styles. American Lifestyles™ 2017 is designed to work with both the Clientell™ consumer analytics platform and Analyze™'s data science and data augmentation services.


Cluster 1: Big City Benefactors (Wealthiest Urban Americans)

This category represents the wealthiest segment of urban Americans. They have gained both high income and high net worth through established careers in business and professional fields or through inherited wealth. They are strongly civic-minded and are major donors and board members in charitable organizations. They spend on high end jewelry, cosmetics and leather goods, international travel and luxury automobiles. They are pragmatic users of technology, and stay connected to their professional and financial interests through smartphones.

Lifestage: Mid-Life
Age: 46-65
Household Income: $250K or Greater
Education: College Educated; 21% Have Attended Graduate School
Drives: BMW X5
Watches: Golf Channel
Typical Communities: Norwalk, CT; Staten Island, NY; Alexandria, VA


Cluster 2: McMansions and Private Schools (High Income Families with Children)

For these upper income suburban American families, their wealth brings exclusivity, status and privilege. Most are two-income households and spend heavily on their oversized homes, decorated with upscale furnishings, high-end appliances and the latest electronics. Activities for the kids are another considerable form of expense, and private schooling is seen as a status symbol and long-term investment. They travel domestically and internationally and spend extra on premium and one-of-a-kind experiences. They are heavy online users and will visit the websites of their favorite luxury brands for exclusive offers.

Lifestage: Mid-Life
Age: 36-65
Household Income: $250K or Greater
Education: College Educated; 14% Have Attended Graduate School
Drives: Acura MDX
Watches: AMC
Typical Communities: Beaumont, TX; Great Falls, VA; Westport, CT


Cluster 3: Careers First (High Income Professional Singles)

These suburban childless couples are heavily invested in their careers, which afford them the financial freedom to spend heavily in home improvement, entertainment and lifestyle products. They have moderate net worth, due to heavy education financing and delayed home ownership while they established themselves personally and professionally. They enjoy considerably more disposable income than their peers with children, which they spend at high end department stores and online specialty retailers. They are heavy commuters and frequent business travellers, so products that save them time and give good long-term value are desirable to them. They are among the most tech-savvy segments of American consumers.

Lifestage: Mid-Life
Age: 36-55
Household Income: $150K-250K
Education: Mix of High School and College Graduates
Drives: Lexus IS 250
Watches: CNBC
Typical Communities: Schenectady, NY; Henderson, NV; Annapolis, MD


Cluster 4: Birthday Cards and Bucket Lists (High Net Worth Retirees)

These urban and suburban seniors are living an economical but comfortable retirement thanks to employer benefits and personal savings. As the elders of America's middle class, they are often leaders in the formal and informal social networks of their community, though many have also flocked to high demand sunbelt retirement states. Despite their strong family connections and financial security, they struggle with declining health and changes in the social landscape. They are minimal debt users and low technology users; 45% have no high speed internet. They spend on professional services, transportation, health care and traditional entertainment like satellite TV and dining out.

Lifestage: Older Adults
Age: 66+
Household Income: $150K-250K
Education: Mix of High School, College and Graduate School
Drives: Chrysler 300
Watches: CBS
Typical Communities: Vancouver, WA; Wilmington, DE; Boynton Beach, FL


Cluster 5: Corporate Climbers (Young High-Earning Professionals)

These 25-45 year old adults are flush with cash from their new-found jobs Corporate America and the digital economy. Their high college debt means they are low net worth, and despite professional success they are still living in rented and shared accommodation in urban communities. They are tech-savvy, creative and political, with 70% having supported liberal candidates in a recent election. They prefer products that speak to their well-educated social consciousness, and will spend more if it helps their favorite cause. They are heavy commuters and frequent business travellers, so buying online is a way to access diverse goods and services while saving time and money. Work-Life Balance is also important for them, expressed through frequent purchases of one-of-a-kind entertainment and travel experiences.

Lifestage: Young Adults
Age: 24-45
Household Income: $150K-250K
Education: College Educated
Drives: Audi Q5
Watches: BBC America
Typical Communities: Seattle, WA; Stamford, CT; Arlington, VA


Cluster 6: Active Grandparents (Upper Income-Earning Seniors)

These high net worth urban seniors are continuing their active lifestyle into retirement. Many own their homes outright and have considerable retirement savings. They are heavily invested in family and community, but splurge on automobiles, home furnishings, cruises and domestic travel to warm-weather destinations. They are avid readers and regular shoppers at high end malls and department stores.

Lifestage: Older Adults
Age: 66+
Household Income: $75K-150K
Education: Mix of High School, College and Graduate School
Drives: Toyota Camry
Watches: History Channel
Typical Communities: Delray Beach, FL; Peoria, AZ; Orange, CA


 

Cluster 7: Big Dreams and Big Commitments (Young Upper Income Couples without Children)

These young adults, ages 24-45, are taking steps to establish their families and careers along traditional lines, even if it takes them a little longer. Most are getting married, buying their first home, financing their first new automobile and spending on a range of home furnishings, clothing and personal care items. They are budget spenders and heavy debt users, but splurge on meals, entertainment and travel to see friends and family. They are heavy technology users across all segments and heavy online purchasers.

Lifestage: Young Adults
Age: 24-45
Household Income: $75K-150K
Education: Mix of High School and College Graduates
Drives: Jeep Liberty
Watches: Bravo
Typical Communities: Lafayette, LA; Saginaw, MI; Kansas City, KS


Cluster 8: College Singles (College-Age Adults with Disposable Incomes)

The youngest segment of American adults, these 18-23 year olds have considerable purchasing power-- with their parents' money. They are uniformly renters, frequent movers and obsessive users of technology. They are heavy spenders in the fashion and digital entertainment segments, with 51% reporting that they watch Netflix more frequently than television. Despite their power to influence discretionary spending for the whole family, their real purchasing power is limited by a lack of income and institutional living.

Lifestage: Young Adults
Age: 18-23
Household Income: N/A
Education: 62% Enrolled in Higher Education
Drives: Volkswagen Jetta
Watches: TBS
Typical Communities: State College, PA; Lansing, MI; Boulder, CO


Cluster 9: Country Love Songs (Middle-Aged Small Town Singles)

These mid-life small town and rural singles are the personification of the lifestyles and experiences represented by country music. They are middle income but low net worth, frequently due to earlier hardships like underemployment and divorce. Their financial hardship is offset by the lower cost of living afforded by their rural lifestyles and high mobility. They are heavy consumers of traditional entertainment but may need satellite TV, radio and internet to stay connected. They shop in a mix of small town retailers, big box stores near major highways and online.

Lifestage: Mid-Life
Age: 30-65
Household Income: $50K-75K
Education: Mostly High School Educated
Drives: Chevrolet Cruze
Watches: Lifetime
Typical Communities: Greensboro, NC; Springfield, IL; Scranton, PA


Cluster 10: American Dream Fading (Low-Savings Baby Boomers)

These aging boomers financed their American dreams and are struggling due to the long-term effects of heavy credit use. Home equity and education borrowing means many still owe on their mortgages and are working past traditional retirement age. They spend on home improvement and home furnishings, domestic travel and entertainment. They patronize a mix of high end and value-priced retailers and are moderate online purchasers. Staying connected with family and friends through cell phones and social media is very important to them.

Lifestage: Older Adults
Age: 66-75
Household Income: $50K-75K
Education: Mix of High School and College Graduates
Drives: Chevrolet Equinox
Watches: TLC
Typical Communities: Columbus, GA; Carson City, NV; Anderson, IN


Please contact us to learn more about all our consumer segmentation categories.